LTI Korea Events

The Poetics of Food and Family: Winning Essay by Rachel Park
LTI Korea’s annual essay contest held at universities and cultural institutions around the world is part of our efforts to make Korean literature more accessible to international readers. Starting with three countries in 2005, the list of participating countries expanded to fourteen by 2016 and included the US, France, Germany, Spain, Mexico, China, Japan, Russia, and Italy. In 2016, LTI Korea held the contest at UC Berkeley and was one of the sponsors of the Sejong Writing Competition held by the Sejong Cultural Society (SCS). Here you can read the winning essays by Rachel Park and Kaitlyn Jurewicz from UC...
Human Connections in The Glass Shield: Winning Essay by Kaitlyn Jurewicz
Kim Junghyuk’s short story “The Glass Shield” is at first glance a whimsical tale of two friends who make spectacles of themselves as they desperately try to find jobs (a situation to which many of today’s millennials can relate). However, this tale is sophisticated in its weaving together of traditional and postmodern elements. Kim uses parody — a common postmodern technique — combined with the traditional doctrines of Confucianism to describe M and the narrator’s search to make meaningful connections in a world to which they are otherwise ill-suited. From the beginning, the author establishes a close friendship between M...
The 15th International Translation and Publication Workshop: The New Avant-garde: Classical Literature Translators
If translators are traitors in the common Italian quip “ traduttore = traditore ,” then translators of classical literature are impostors. Not only do they betray the original text, they present on the pedestal of the “classical” a translated text whose linguistic texture, cultural status, and historical trajectory cannot possibly be adequately transposed into any other language. The complexities a translator, especially of non-Western classical literatures into Western languages, has to take into consideration are daunting. Take prosody: attempting to make palpable the patterns of a Chinese “regulated poem” in English can only result in hopeless exoticizing antiquarianism in our...
The 14th LTI Korea Translation Award: Voice from the Source
My fateful Korean adventure began in 2010, and I never would’ve dreamed back then that someday, I would be receiving a translation award. I would not be here today if I hadn’t received a scholarship for foreign students given by the Korean government, which gave me the opportunity to live and study in Korea for the past three years. During this time, I fell in love with Korea’s culture, and naturally enough, with its literature. What has most attracted me to Korean literature has been the fact that it carries within it the very narrative and thoughts of the Korean...
The 14th LTI Korea Translation Award: A Latecomer Translator
First of all, I would like to say how grateful I am for the unexpected joy of receiving an email, on an afternoon where both the country and I were having a gloomy day, from the President of LTI Korea congratulating me on winning a translation award. The chance to translate a Korean literary work was an especially cherished one for me, as I have loved books all my life. But upon reflection, it is not just Kim Soon Hee, translator, who is being given this award, but also the author Lee Seung-U who entrusted me with his work, as...
The 14th LTI Korea Translation Award: In Search of Resonance
I began translating Korean literature when Korea was designated the Guest of Honor for the 2005 Frankfurt Book Fair. Selected as a co-translator for one of the books in the subsequent “One Hundred Korean Books” project, I engaged in literary translation for the first time in my life, which in turn led me to LTI Korea, who went on to support me in translating Korean fiction for the next decade. I am very happy and honored to be receiving such a significant prize from them for my translation of Seven Years of Darkness . The original work is over five...
The 14th LTI Korea Translation Award: A Translator’s Journey
LTI Korea presents the LTI Korea Translation Award to translators who have enriched the quality of Korean literature in translation. Four titles were chosen for the award this year from among eighty-nine books published in fourteen languages in 2015. Here, the award winners share their thoughts on Korean literature. I did my BA in English literature, but chafed at the restriction to works originally written in English, as I’d always read more in translation than not. Then in 2009, just after the financial crisis, I graduated with no more specific skill than “can write about books.” I suspected learning a...
Seoul International Writers’ Festival : Dreaming Seoul
As I crossed the world from one extreme to the other to arrive in Seoul from Colombia, I thought about Asia, about what got me interested in Asia, and then I remembered an author, Joseph Conrad, and his great novel Lord Jim , in which a young man flees guilt, a guilt obtained through inexperience and ambition, when he allows himself to be carried away by hardened and soulless sailors to commit a cowardly act. And where does Lord Jim flee? To the East, further and further east. First he goes to Singapore and later advances to the Malay peninsula...
Seoul International Writers’ Festival: My Experience at SIWF
I’ve been to so many literary festivals. Maybe about seventy-five of them now, in thirty countries. They are my favorite part of book touring, because rather than moving quickly from city to city and hearing only myself speak on stage or in interviews, I have a chance to spend a few nights in one location and be in conversation with other writers and journalists and everyone working for the festival. So I expected to enjoy the Seoul International Writers’ Festival, but still I was surprised by how great the experience was and how unique. Each evening on stage we had...
BCLT International Literary Translation and Creative Writing Summer School: Where’s My Title?
I stayed for a week at the University of East Anglia in Norwich. I was there to attend the British Centre for Literary Translation Summer School. This year, workshops were held for Korean, German, Russian, Swedish, and multilingual prose and multilingual poetry. I took part in the Korean to English workshop. All throughout, my role was like a visitor or an observer — at times happy, often surprised, sometimes lonely, and for the most part cautiously watching the translators at work. Eleven translators attended the Korean workshop, which usually consisted of two sessions daily of an hour and a half...

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